New Ebay delivery service

When we decided it was time for an upgrade to Blue Rover’s hot water system, little did we know what we were starting!

We replaced the existing vertical calorifier located in the engine room with a new horizontal version which we could fit under the bed (toasty!) But what to do with the old and perfectly servicable calorifier? Ebay seemed the perfect solution.

Seven days later and the calorifier was sold to it new owner. We just needed to get it to him.

Loading on to Blue Rover ready for the delivery trip
Loading on to Blue Rover ready for the delivery trip

With Blue Rover based at Anderton on the T&M and the new owner at Preston Brook Marina at the bottom of the Runcorn  Arm, the answer seemed obvious. Delivery by narrowboat wasn’t an option on the Ebay menu but what the heck! Arrangements were made and the calorifer was shipped aboard Blur Rover for the journey to Preston Brook. 3 hours, 3 tunnels and 1 lock later, delivery was made to the new owner on their project boat, a 70ft x 12ft ex trip boat with an interesting feature – propellors and rudders at both ends – no need to wind. I know a few people who would benefit from this addition!

Safe arrival and handover at Preston Brook Marina

Good luck to Mick in his project. I hope his new calorifier provides many years of hot water. Maybe our experience will open up a whole new option for Ebay deliveries?

Roads to nowhere

Before I start, an update on Floodgate – it seems the water pump was the culprit and the offending pump is now serving time in a CRT waste bin. 5 days later with stirling service from a battery operated caravan fan purchased from Lidl for a fiver, the cabin bilge is now pretty much dry and normal service is resumed.

The last couple of days cruising the Caldon and currently moored in the idyllic surroundings of the tunnel pool on the Leek branch, with only 3 ducks and 2 families of geese for company, has got me thinking about the joys of dead end canals!

Over the past couple of years we have cruised a number of them:

  • The Llangollen
  • Shropshire Union to Ellesmere Port
  • The Caldon

And they are all, in their different ways, wonderful. First and foremost, they are wonderful because they don’t go anywhere. The only reason to cruise them is for the joy of doing so. Because of this, and because most people don’t understand the pleasure of this kind of boating, they tend to be pretty quiet.

imageThe second thing that these canals have in common is that if you make it to the end, you are rewarded with an amazing mooring spot.

Up til now, my boating has tended to be about doing the distance, (usually in a ring) you have a week, or 2 weeks, and it’s about working out how far you can go in the time. More recently the distance travelled in a given time  has been reducing, but it has been about using Pearsons ( other guides are available, but not sure why you would want to use them) to  divide the route by the days available, and that was your itinerary. This trip, we had 2 weeks and the plan was “to do the Caldon”. Using the above system, even on a leisurely itinerary, we would be back in a week. So Pearsons stayed on the shelf, and we are going with the flow.  So far the flow has taken us to the end of the Caldon Leek branch and a night alone with the geese. Tomorrow  who  knows, but after 30 odd years of boating, I think I am finally starting to get it!



Water Water Eveywhere

Back on board for our 2 week cruise and fortunate for us we had no real itinerary, as things did not start well!!

I read in Waterways World a couple of months ago that being on a narrowboat is a bit like being stranded on Mars (as depicted in the book/film The Martian) whilst the consequences of failure are somewhat more drastic on Mars (get it wrong and you are dead!), I can definitely see the parallels.

The skills of problem solving and lateral thinking are key boating requirements, and in this case the problem was water – Too much of it in the wrong place!

The crew who had brought the boat back from Crick commented that all had been well with the boat, but reported a calorifier leak leading to damp under the bed.

Further investigation suggested the calorifier was not the source – seems that leak is sorted. Now to a process of elimination.

  1. All other pipe work – dry
  2. Shower drain pump and all connections – dry
  3. Carpet next to the bed – wet – very wet

Lifting the cabin floorboards we found the source of the damp. The bedroom bilge was full of water! Now everyone knows that in a boat the water should be on the outside, so this was not good.

45 mins and 10 buckets later, the water was put back in its right place, and the question then was where is it coming from. For this, there were again 3 options:

  1. The central heating
  2. Rain from leaking windows
  3. The one we really didn’t want to think about – The canal!!

Central heating was the favorite – it had never worked that well,  we had topped it up a few times and that water had to have gone somewhere!

We had ruled out the domestic water, as the pump had not been running (tell tale sign of a leak). But I decided to check the water tank anyway, and glad I did. It seems that the above is only true as long as it’s not the actual pump that is leaking! And it was. Didn’t seem to be leaking much, but small leaks add up over time! Still not a conviction, but definitely charged and reprimanded in custody pending further investigation! I still think this crime was not committed  alone, and central heating is still in the frame and under surveillance.


Anyway enough of the crime metaphor. I think a visit to Kings Lock chandlery may be in order later, and a maintenance day is on the cards.

As I said at the beginning, lucky we didn’t have an itinerary!

Roll forward 4 hours, and a very strange shopping list (water pump and a pack of Incontinence pads) later, we were ready to start the repair job.

Replacing the pump was infact pretty straight forward, with the only complication being why, when the old pump had a built in pressure switch, was there an external one fitted. Deciding that it was probably because the built in one had failed at some time in the past, I chose to leave it out. If nothing else it meant 2 fewer connections in the circuit.

Fired up the new pump, no leaks (check) water out of taps (check) – so far so good – and as a bonus the flow rate out of the taps (and the shower) were also much improved. All looked good, and to top it all, the amount of water flowing into the bedroom bilge ( where all this started) also seemed to be slowing.

Given that the water had had to traverse half the length of the boat to get from the leak to the flood, it was reasonable to expect that it would take a while to dry out, hence the need for the incontinence pads. These were installed in the bilge to soak up the remaining water.  Tip for anyone doing plumbing jobs, inco pads are an excellent way to soak up inevitable leakages – obviously really, not sure why Tena  haven’t thought of this already!!

Tomorrow will tell whether the problem is solved! Fingers crossed.

Call me crazy, but this is why I love boating!

Homeward Bound – Days 5 & 6

Stowaways – 1

Wales – 0 (Portugal 2)

Swan attacks -1

Flesh eating horse fly attacks – 1

Day 5 dawned bright and sunny (this is getting monotonous) and we set off at 8 am on what would prove to be a long day’s cruise. Overnight I had been informed that ‘the toilet appears to be overflowing‘ it didn’t appear to be overflowing, it WAS overflowing – and guess who had to deal with it!

Inevitably my focus was on reaching the CRT services at Great Heywood and normalising the toilet situation. As we passed through Rugeley we suddenly realised we needed a provisions restock (actually I think my crew needed to visit the toilet at Tesco) so they were both despatched as I cruised on alone. I don’t think they appreciated that typical cruising speed is pretty similar to typical walking speed so it could take HOURS for them to catch up. Eventually I relented I slowed to wait for them.

The swan attack took place in the afternoon as a (perfectly reasonable) swan took offence to crew member Neil being in the vicinity and decide to lash out. Neil cranked the throttle and left the neighbourhood. Peace returned as we headed for Stone.

Good thing we hadn’t planned to stop in Stone. There was NO space. This seems to be pretty common in the area (in my experience). As we ascended Stone locks we passed the birthplace of my favourite narrowboat (Strathspey – if anyone knows the owner and can convince them to sell for a fair price, give me a call!)

Then ensued our daily debate of what to do for the evening – pub or countryside. The pub on offer was the Plume of Feathers at Barlaston and, as regular readers of this stuff will know, we aren’t impressed. The earlier correspondent from May tried to convince that it was really OK despite their rant here.

We weren’t swayed and my home made macaroni cheese at a mooring as far from the railway line as possible was order of the day.

Question: Has anyone visited Lakeside Tavern? It is marked in Pearson but there is no reference in the text. Last TripAdvisor report was in 2014 but there were cars parked outside this morning?

Having listened to Andy Murray’s Quarter Final Wimbledon victory on the radio, we eventually fired up the TV to watch the second half of Wales-Portugal. The deed was done and what we saw wasn’t great.

Rain overnight had cleared by this morning and as we stopped to queue at Trentham Lock the stowaway boarded. I noticed a Robin standing on the edge of the cratch he/she then hopped down onto the cratch floor to feast on the detritus from yesterday’s crisps. All fine but I was taken aback when said robin the flew into the saloon. I dread to think what happened over the next minutes but when I returned to take the boat into the lock, the interloper was nowhere to be seen and, as far as I could tell, all valuables were in place.

On the way towards Stoke, the horseflies got hungry. Fortunately for Neil and I, Steve was the tastiest.

Pounds were low through the Stoke flight but we got up the locks with no problems. Between Stoke and Harecastle it started to rain! Not a lot but enough to make me put my coat on. We arrived at the tunnel just as as southbound convoy started – and with one of them taking 50 mins to get through (leaving clouds of exhaust in their wake).

Since Blue Rover went south in May, new profile boards had been fitted at the Harecastle entrance. Our topbox squeezed through with about an inch to spare. The tunnel keeper was happy and we were off.

35 minutes and we were through – out into sunshine and on to Heartbreak hill. Very easy passage down to Rode Heath and the Broughton Arms for tea. (We visited the Royal Oak but weren’t convinced)

On the way, my pic of the day which wins my award for most unnecessary waste of money on a CRT sign:


I don’t think any but the most naive to day-boat hirer would try to use this lock.

Last full day tomorrow. 🙁


Homeward Bound 2 – Days 3 & 4

Rain showers – 0

Sunburn – 2

Music – none.

Left our ‘M69’ mooring at 8.30 heading to meet the 12.23 Birmingham to Leicester train at Nuneaton to collect our 3rd crew member. ‘Found’ the missing Lock 1 at Hawksbury junction but the rest of the trip to Nuneaton was uneventful. Canal and station are on opposite sides of the town so our walk across gave a chance to see the sights. Nuneaton is pleasant enough but unremarkable.

Station meet-up went on time and according to plan. We were back on the boat with full complement by 1.15.

I have to say that IMHO the Coventry isn’t the most inspiring of canals. My highlights were Hartshill Yard and learning what a Laccolith is (Rawn Hill Bridge 37). Having worked down Atherstone Locks we arrived in Polesworth to find (a theme is starting here) it was shut. We had been recommended an indian restaurant but it transpired all restaurants in Polesworth are shut on Mondays. The Monday entertainment was a travelling fairgound which accounted for the large number of yoofs wandering around some of whom were (according to Neil) unnecessarily foul-mouthed. I blame the parents!

Getting hungry, we opted for the Indian takeaway which (we subsequently discovered) was the same place frequented by the ‘Down Trip’ crew back in May. We agree it was very tasty.

Day 4 dawned cloudy but dry and as we set off things seemed to be going very slowly. I don’t know whether it was a shallow bit of canal but for a good 30 mins progress was certainly laboured. Things then improved for a while until the ‘travelling through treacle‘ returned. This time the answer was obvious when we looked. Somehow a plank had wedged itself across the bow acting as a very effective brake for half an hour. Our vague plan to reach Fradley for a late lunch was well and truly sent west.

The upside was a very pleasant late lunch at The Plough in Huddlesford. Fradley came and went. We stopped for the night here:


Not sure where it is but somewhere near Handsacre and a lovely sunny end to the day.


Homeward Bound – the first day and a half

Crew members converted to drowned rat – 1

Convoys joined – 1

Rabbits saved – 1

Classic album of the day – Fuzzy, Grant Lee Buffalo

The trip back started well, Gayton  Marina and it wasn’t raining! In fact it was sunny. Within 5 minutes we passed 2 boats I recognised leading my newly acquired crew member Neil thinking we knew pretty much every boater in the Midlands. Unfortunately the stats have headed steadily downhill since..

The trip up to Norton Junction reversed the trip down. Locks in the dry followed by 4 hours in the rain was swapped for 4 hours dry followed by locks in showers,  some of which were INTENSE. It was at lock 11 that crew member Neil was converted to drowned rat. He was stoic and allowed the warm July sunshine that appeared 10 minutes later dry him out.

Braunston locks were shared with Keith and his family from Edinburgh They were on their first ever canal trip, and loving it. Unfortunately Brauntston was shut. Why doesn’t the Wheatsheaf do food? Ended up at Marstons 2 for 1 family friendly theme pub The Boathouse. It was very average but cheap.

Next morning and not long out of Braunston, we joined ‘The Convoy’. 4 boats travelling VERY slowly. Eventually arrived at Hillmorton where I raised things with the lead boat. The following conversation ensued:

Me: Would you mind letting people behind you come past if they wish.

Him: The speed limit on the canal is 4mph.

Me: I know but you were doing much less than that. (I’d clocked him at 1.7mph)

Him: I don’t think this boat will go much faster.

Me: I’m not asking you to speed up, just be aware of people around you.

Him: Shrug

Anyway, after some discussion and slick lockwork we managed to get out of the Convoy and never saw any of them again. Such is life on the canals.

It was at Hillmorton locks 5/4 that we made the rabbit-rescue. A young rabbit was stuck in a lock by- wash and clearly not happy. I managed to grab it’s ears and lift it out, shocked but alive. It made it into the hedge so fingers crossed it survived the ordeal.

BTW where is Hillmorton lock 1?

Rest of the trip down the Oxford (so Far! ) pretty uneventful though my attempts to identify any of the loops marking the original route of Brindley’s were pathetic failures.

Finally a reflection on modern life: a plot of canal bank with 90ft mooring space. Mains water but no electricity. Offers over £90,000.

You used to be able to buy a narrowboat for that!

So we are up to date moored somewhere about half a mile from the M69 but you’d never think it:





Last Weekend Daan Saarf

  • Trips through the Blisworth Tunnel – 4
  • New music systems installed on the boat – 1
  • Miserable blacksmiths met – 1
  • Continuous Cruisers with engine trouble – 1

Since our epic trip to Crick at the end of May, Blue Rover has been based at Gayton, allowing us a few trips to do a bit of southern boating, before the boat heads back Oop Naarth next weekend.

imageDuring our time down here it has been great to meet up with old friends and make a new one – the Blisworth Tunnel – 3rd longest on the network ( beaten by Stanage and Dudley) and in my opinion – the most boring- it’s wide, and straight, and for the most part concrete! At least the Harecastle has the jeopardy of hitting your head on the roof in the middle!

It seems to be the case that wherever you go from Gayton (South at least) you go through the Blisworth Tunnel – my record so far is 31 mins – I plan to beat that tomorrow on my 4th trip this month! I’m sure I will miss it when we head home.

Friday was an epic evening as we met up with Alpha – a boat belonging to a friend on which we had our first experience of non hireboat boating – it was the first time Blue Rover had met Alpha, but they spent a wonderful evening breasted up in Blisworth &  I am sure they will be the best of buddies. We were planning a cruise together but when we arrived I was shown Alpha’s engine, and could see the pistons – I’m not that mechanical, but I’m pretty sure that is not good – so we had to cruise alone. it made me think that continuous cruising must be bad for engines, as it is amazing how many CCers have “engine trouble”. Alpha having been as reliable as clockwork for 20 years, has major engine trouble within 12 months of being a CC.  Though the lack of a cylinder head definitely removes the “” in this case! – If you want my full opinion on the CC debate, you will find it on the letters page of the latest issue of Waterways world!

3 things I will not miss whe we head home are:

  • Floating caravans – Sorry wide beam boats – we did see one moving though, so the rumours that they don’t have engines are not true!
  • Wide locks – narrow locks always have a queue of boats waiting, so why, when you go through wide locks, where company makes life so much easier, is there never another boat in sight!
  • The lack of village shops – S of the Blisworth Tunnel, non of the villages seem to have shops! – makes catering V difficult. You have to plan, and I hate planning.

Which brings me on to the music system – nothing to do with planning, just seemed a good time to bring it up:

Ever since owning a boat, we have been looking for the perfect sound system – the norm being a very unsatisfactory car stereo with Bluetooth phone connection. I now think I have come up with the ultimate solution. In addition to an inverter (my solution requires 240v) To implement this you will need:

  • 2 – Sonos Play 1s – though on a budget, 1 will do.
  • 1 Raspberry pi
  • USB hard disc

Together this gives a fantastic solution allowing you to play music from a library stored on the USB disc as mp3s, all controllable from your phone or tablet and removing the streaming issues we had previously. – If you are interested in the details leave a comment to the effect, and if there is enough interest I will post more details – I will probably do it anyway at some point, cos I think it is a brilliant solution.

Which only leaves the miserable Blacksmith – the fact is he was so miserable I don’t want to drag you down with the details – so I won’t. But rest assured it was a sorry story.

I can’t finish a blog written during these interesting times when we have decided as a nation to leave the EU without mentioning it. So I thought I would leave you with the up and down sides of the decision as far as I see it:

Downside – It’s  crazy decision made by people who have been conned by the politicians into thinking the grass is greener – A decision that I am sure we will live to regret

Upside – Us boaters  should get cheaper fuel as the tax on propulsion diesel imposed by the EU will be removed – number 1 priority in the discussions from here, I am absolutely sure!

All in all its the reason why referenda are a bad Idea, as they reduce complex issues that few people understand to a simple yes no decisions. In reality, life is never that black & white. That’s why we elect a parliament.

Let’s face it, asking the nation for an opinion never ends well – Did they learn nothing from Boaty McBoatface!

Crick to Norton Junction

Hours cruised – 4

Sofa beds delivered – 1

Sofa beds disposed of -1

Reverse only boats – 1

Crick show is over for another year and the weather-gods continued to smile. Not a drop of rain over all 3 days. Statistically this can’t bode well for next year.

This morning saw delivery of our new sofa bed – a definite improvement. Also very convenient as we stopped for water at Crick Wharf and the bed delivery van pulled up right next to the boat – unfortunately the van door opened onto a large patch of mud. Needless to say quantities were delivered in to the boat along with the sofa. Handy they could take away the old one at the same time though.

Crick Wharf also saw the departure of 50% of the crew (60% if you count the dog) leaving 2 of us to head off to Gayton Marina.

The trip to Norton Junction was uneventful except for a couple of things either end of Watford Locks.

First, at the top, the CRT toilets, while clean and functional,  did remind me of a typical US jail cell. All stainless steel, no seat and everything bolted down. Imagine my surprise to discover an electrically operated no-touch foamy handwash dispenser next to the sink (cold tap only). Do check it out if you are in the area. Second, at the bottom of the locks was the reverse-only boat. Called Hullabaloo, it had decided that forwards was reverse and reverse was non-existant. I hope the engineer turned up to rescue the family on board.

We decided to stick with the Leicester line for one more night and moored just before Norton Junction. I’m glad we did because the moorings on the main line round the corner are somewhat utilitarian.

Next stop Gayton.

Crick 2016 Day 2

Hours cruised 0

IDIOTS 0 but depends, could be 2 (probably is)

Classic album Power in the Darkness  TRB (Much of it live from the man himself this evening)

A great day and Crick starting the day late with a visit to the Danish  van and the toilet!

We now own a new sofa bed, hopefully more comfortable than the old one   Afternoon  tea in the VIP lounge (despite no WW goody bag) and a small afternoon snooze  for those left behind,  Boo can snore when she chooses.

An evening in the beer tent watching the brilliant  Tom Robinson who at 66 is fabulous.  Idiot of the day was asking us to sit down! When told it was a gig got a bit sniffy so we moved to the mosh Pit!  For those over 50!

A fantastic concert helped on by the great beer tent.

New bed delivered tomorrow. Can’t wait. Full report to come

Crick Boatshow day 1

Boat shows visited – 1

Hours cruised – 0

Classic album REM Automatic for the people  should have been Parallel lines by Blondie but dodgy internet stopped this (more of this later)

Before I start, a couple of points about our hosts Crick Marina. Obviously, when the gift of hospitality was given out, they were out . Considering that the show is all about the waterways, they don’t make visiting  boaters very welcome.

  • Can we have access to facilities to empty toilets etc  – No
  • Can we have access to wifi as 3G is naff here (happy to pay for it) – No

Very welcoming! Makes me wonder why they have the show here!

There may be very good reasons for this approach, but if there are, it would be nice to know them. I can feel a letter to Waterways World (or maybe this is one for Canal Boat Mag, as I now have a subscription to hat too – Looking forward to the wine!)

Anyway, rant over so on with the post.

Boat show opened at 10 with regular countdown which interrupted the bacon and egg sandwich production momentarily whilst we listened to the countdown with bated breath.

Visited loads of useful stalls, exhaust chap, new propeller chap and passed the composting toilet throne chap complete with step to allow you to wee in total comfort and also bought some very nice gin and had a pause to have test lie on a potential new sofa bed, we did ask if we could take a sleeping bag and have a sleepover.

Ended the day with a g ‘n t with newly purchased rhubarb gin a satisfactory meal in the  Moorings restaurant and a quick pint in the beer tent listening to a Blondied tribute band (I said there would be more later. )

Loads of interesting places to visit

Roll on Crick day 2